Weed Eraser, Inc. - Specialist in the Elimination and Control of Unsightly, Unwanted Vegetation

Specialist in the Elimination and Control of Unsightly, Unwanted Vegetation

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POISON IVY

Do you have poison ivy growing in your yard?

We have a designated team specially trained in the control
and removal of Poison ivy and other noxious weeds.

"Leaves of three, let it be"

Identification - There are two species of poison ivy that we find here in Michigan:

Toxicodendron radicans: poison ivy that exists as a climbing vine or shrub, commonly with three leaflets to a leaf (occasionally singly lobed), and often with hairy stems or vines. Common from the eastern US to Mexico.

Toxicodendron rydbergii: Rydberg’s poison ivy occurs as a low non-climbing shrub with three leaflets (of varying shape) per leaf. The leaflets can have hairy undersides. Common from southern Canada to the west central US.

Both species produce smooth green berries that turn white in autumn, and have leaves that can be smooth ovals or toothed (rarely lobed, like poison oak)

New poison ivy growing in the spring

Photo credit: photofarmer / Foter.com / CC BY

 

New poison ivy

growing in the

spring season

is most often

waxy and red

New poison ivy growing in the spring

Photo credit: Puzzler4879 / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

 

Summer poison ivy

Photo credit: blmurch / Foter.com / CC BY

 

In summer,

poison ivy can

be found growing

either erect from

the ground or

as vines climbing

trees, fences, walls,

along the forest floor, etc.

Fall poison ivy

Photo credit: CaptPiper / Foter.com / CC BY-NC

 

Poison ivy in the

fall can actually

look quite pretty,

as the leaves are

some of the first

in the forest

to change to

brilliant reds,

oranges and yellows.

Fruit/berries of poison ivy

 

The fruit/berries of poison ivy often persist through

the winter, changing from green to white in autumn,

and provide a significant food source for birds.

 

The urushiol (rash causing oil) of the plant also persists

and can even remain active for years after the plants

death. So DO NOT TOUCH it! Even if the vines are bare!

Roughly 85% of the population will have a skin reaction

from contact with urusiol! Also, avoid burning poison

ivy, as the smoke can be very dangerous to inhale.

 

Photo credit: BlueRidgeKitties / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Fruit/berries of poison ivy

Fruit/berries of poison ivy

 

 

Photo credit: Lorianne DiSabato / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND          Photo credit: zen / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA
   

Some of the most commonly misidentified plants taken for poison ivy

are wild raspberry and blackberry, box elder saplings, and Virginia creepers

(as well as the common grape vine, not pictured)

Raspberry Plant

Box Elder Sapling

Virginia Creeper

 

Raspberry Plant

Box Elder Sapling

Virginia Creeper

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